1. Environmental Facts 2014 Infographic

    Environmental Facts 2014 Infographic

  2. scandinaviancollectors:

A Sydney Harbour penthouse by Sarah Davison Interior Design: Eero Saarinen Executive chairs (1950), Florence Knoll dining table with a marble top (1961) and Poul Henningsen´s Artichoke pendant lamp (1958). Photography by Prue Ruscoe. / Australian Interior Design Awards

    scandinaviancollectors:

    A Sydney Harbour penthouse by Sarah Davison Interior Design: Eero Saarinen Executive chairs (1950), Florence Knoll dining table with a marble top (1961) and Poul Henningsen´s Artichoke pendant lamp (1958). Photography by Prue Ruscoe. / Australian Interior Design Awards

  3. Mondays…

    Mondays…

  4. Ergonomics Tips for Everyday Life  →

    humanscale:

    You’ve got the best ergonomic work tools to keep you safe, healthy and comfortable while you work, but have you ever wondered how to protect your posture doing everyday activities? We spoke with our ergonomists about how to prevent discomfort, injury and musculoskeletal disorders in daily life.

  5. newyorker:

How should a modern workplace be furnished, decorated, and designed? Ben Mauk explores the century-old question: http://nyr.kr/1hYDEnF

“An engineer named Frederick Winslow Taylor, best known for exalting standardization (of scheduling, wages, equipment, and so on) for the sake of productivity, advocated that managers arrange their workers into cell-like spaces tailored to the simple, unskilled labor that each would perform. His ideas—known as scientific management or, simply, Taylorism—helped to inspire not only the modern factory but also the rigidly planned mid-century office, and they remain widespread in the business world.”

Photograph: Amy Eckert/UpperCut Images/Getty

    newyorker:

    How should a modern workplace be furnished, decorated, and designed? Ben Mauk explores the century-old question: http://nyr.kr/1hYDEnF

    “An engineer named Frederick Winslow Taylor, best known for exalting standardization (of scheduling, wages, equipment, and so on) for the sake of productivity, advocated that managers arrange their workers into cell-like spaces tailored to the simple, unskilled labor that each would perform. His ideas—known as scientific management or, simply, Taylorism—helped to inspire not only the modern factory but also the rigidly planned mid-century office, and they remain widespread in the business world.”

    Photograph: Amy Eckert/UpperCut Images/Getty

  6. (via Healthcare Trend: Wall Mounted Monitors)

    (via Healthcare Trend: Wall Mounted Monitors)

  7. 7 ways to create a healthier workplace →